FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

IS APPLICATION PROCESS DIFFICULT?

Our application process includes an online application and three reference forms. Selected applicants will be offered a chance to interview with our Project SLEYA team.  Due to the limited number spots available , our application process can be competitive, but we will strongly consider any applicant who meets our required criteria. 

HOW MANY PARTICIPANTS ARE ACCEPTED?

We can accept up to 30 participants each year, with 10 participants assigned to each of our 3 tracks.

CAN I DO PROJECT SLEYA WITH MY FRIENDS?

Project SLEYA will select participants based on their application. It is possible that you can participate with a friend, but we select participants individual of any other applicants. Our hope is that this experience will lead you to develop new friendships with peers across central Ohio

HOW MUCH WILL I HAVE TO PAY FOR THIS EXPERIENCE

We want our trips to be accessible to anyone who wants to participate. We recognize that not everyone can afford the full cost of the experience, thus trip fees are based on financial need. We will work with any participant that demonstrates financial need and we will never turn down a qualified applicant for inability to pay.

IS SERVICE-LEARNING THE SAME AS VOLUNTOURISM?

Voluntourism is a popular concept amongst travelers, as it allows them to give back to the communities that they are visiting as a tourist. Project SLEYA is not voluntourism. While there is nothing wrong with voluntourism, it is not structured as an authentic learning experience, nor does it prioritize the community that is being served. Project SLEYA, however, is a service-learning experience. Unlike voluntourism, service-learning intentionally links volunteering and service with designed educational outcomes and community improvement outcomes. For service-learning to be successful, participants must engage with real community issues, while understanding and addressing the cultural, political, social and historical context that contributes to those community issues. Service-learning participants do not see themselves as fixing another community’s problem, rather as a resource that community members can rely on to help them address their own problems.